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," and also tonight, technology correspondent david pogue. starting this week, he takes over as host of "nova sciencenow" here on pbs. that is coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: joan walsh is an editor at large for salon and the author of a new book, "what's the matter w/white people?: why we long for a golden age that never was." she joins us tonight from new york. >> thank you, tavis. good to be back. tavis: this title is provocative. "what's the matter with white people?" >> the title has three meanings, but we get stuck on one, thanks to mitt romney and paul ryan. why does it happen that 90% of identified republicans according to the gallup poll are white in a coun
. tonight we look ahead to technology that could be in our future. an update on europe and its ongoing financial crisis. e.u. officials say the region's economy shrunk more than expected in the second quarter. year-to-year the eurozone economy contracted by nearly 1%, that's almost twice as much as what was calculated last month. but the e.u.'s statistics agency says the revision could be due to the region's economy being stronger than thought a year ago. the revision isn't expected to change policymakers' decisions regarding stimulus and bailout efforts. >> susie: even as more americans find work, there are still 12 million people searching for jobs and many workers are discovering they need new skills to land one. you only have to go as far as your local goodwill for some job training services. just last year, more than 3.5 million people reached out to goodwill industries international for help with job training and placement. sylvia hall continues our look at job retraining. when you think of goodwill, you may think of a store like this. what you may not know is that the money made
national security threats, warning their technology equipment could be used for spying. >> susie: i'm susie gharib. it's that time of year again, earnings season, we look at what wall street's expecting from third quarter results. >> tom: and speaking of seasons, it's already looking a lot like christmas for the nation's retailers. this year could be the best ever for online holiday shopping. >> susie: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> tom: two of china's top telecommunications companies are a threat to u.s. national security. that's the conclusion of the u.s. house intelligence committee after a year-long investigation into emerging technology giants z.t.e. and huawei. huawei says the report relies on rumors and speculation, and the company warns a trade battle could cost the jobs of thousands of workers in the united states. but, as darren gersh reports, there is growing bipartisan agreement that this is the right time to get tough on chinese cyber-theft. >> reporter: in unusually blunt language the bipartisan leadership of the house committee warned u.s. companies not to buy their br
of the law enforcement agencies, new federal police with the state of the art technology and reliable people. and at the same time, decreasing a weakening process of the organized crime. we have put in jail or they die like 23 out of the 37 most wanted criminals in mexico. so from 2009 to 2012. >> rose: immigration, give us some free advice as to what would be the best immigration reform in the united states in your judgement because you have this very long border. >> first one fact which is very important, charlie, according with the pew institute, the rate of migration from mexican workers to the united states, the net ratio reached 0 in 2010 and 2011. what that means that the number of mexican workers go you will up or going north is more or less roughly exactly the same as the mexican workers going south. why? this is a factor due to good and bad reasons. the bad reasons, if you want, is the american recession. more aggressive policy on the border. 15 days ago the american policeman killed a mexican father on the border who was just on a picnic with his kids on the mexican side. probably
, it is hopeful. journalism has been decentralized by the technology, there are more voices. more people are doing journalism today on more platforms than ever before, and i think that's good. i think technology will enhance journalism. it will enable us to do crowd sourcing, to engage with communities via facebook and twitter. it will be more participate tore. we can skype interviews in faraway places so there's a lot of things to be hopeful for. we can engage communities, that's what i'm hopeful for. the part that i'm worried about is a financial question, how are we going to support quality journalism in the digital age. what is the appropriate business model for the new world. >> belva: steve, are the opportunities for originality and enterprise, one would think it might be because of the plentiful ways that news gets put together? >> yes. and i think that in this day and age ordinary commodity generic stories are not going to do it for an audience. it has to be original, it has to be enterprising because there's all this information out there and you need to stand out by doing original, creat
in business and the economy and technology and i had a front row seat for 20 years watching this. >> rose: lessons of geography, a new movie and a life stephen shepard lived in journalism when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: robert kaplan is here, he is chief geopolitical analyst and has been writing about foreign affairs for 25 years. in his latest book he says to better understand global issues we must look to a map. he examines how geography has influenced the balance of world power and how it can inform foreign policy in the future. it is called "the revenge of geography." i'm pleased to have him back on this program. welcome. >> rose: >> a pleasure to be here, charlie. >> rose: henry kissinger said-- and you put this at the top-- that "robert kaplan's research shines light on an ancient truth. geography has been the predominant factor in determinesing the fate of nations, from fay roenic egypt to the arab spring." how long have you been thinking about tht? >> my whole career as a foreign corres
, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the former football coach who plunged penn state university into scandal by his sexual abuse of young boys over many years was sentenced today. the judge called his crime a "story of betrayal." jerry sandusky wore a red jail jump suit and a smile as he entered the center county courthouse this morning, less than two hours later, the smile was gone after the 68-year-old learned he will likely spend the rest of his life in prison. lead prosecutor. >> i believe that the sentence that the court imposed today was a wise and proper one and that it reflectedded the seriousness of the defendant's crimes. the harm he caused and the need to remove him from society. >> woodruff: sandusky was convicted three months ago on 45 counts of sexually abusing ten young
, the music industry, given all of the digital technology, there has to be something more than the music that drives people to you. for me, if i have a hot sun or not, and these people are turning into my life. just about the song is doing well on the charts. tavis: you mean the books, the reality tv, the clothing line. >> the lifestyle i have lived since i was a youngster and the lifestyle i have been blessed enough to walk into right now. i am delivering this lifestyle and you can't let go lifestyle. tavis: i like that. you can't bootleg a lifestyle. but is there a danger in putting out there, for your fanbase, a lifestyle you can't have. all rappers are selling a lifestyle that while they can't bootleg it, they can have it. >> i don't believe there is any human being that if he puts 100% of his time, effort, and energy into achieving a goal that it can't happen. i simply don't believe that. for people that say they never can, your faith is weak and you don't deserve to achieve it. anybody with the right amount of skill, effort, energy, and ingenuity can accomplish anything. tavis: i d
whether or not in the world we live today with all this available through technology and all you can do at your computer at your house and the minicam, how much of this is excuse making now where we do not at least put the project out there and try to make it happen? >> the films are being made. the industry is gone. the barriers to get it distributed at a level where you make it to this character difficult. there are three or four dozen black filmmakers in their 30's, early 40's, lay 20's, men and women in equal numbers, making beautiful films. is there an audience for them? want to prove that, the hollywood machinery will, and if they do not come, we create our own ways to do that. it is choice. people are like, i want to write a script. have you read the book? do have a final draft? and. how're you going to do that? where do you study? no. we know those people. i also know brilliant people who are making this black independent cinema, this new wave that we're calling it. a few of us are getting studios. there are tons of us and we need to find a way to reach your audience. it does no
we have come to rely on satnav, in fact, anything involving satellite technology, the more critically important research like this has become. ideally, they will work out a way of forecasting the most damaging effects. there is still a lot of mystery about the sun, how it disturbs the atmosphere, and what that means for us, but this is where we will start to get some answers. >> ok. i always knew that maps were the best thing. that brings our program to a close. if you like to find me, fine dust on t -- find us on twitter. from all of us, thanks for watching. i'll see you back here tomorrow. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> "bbc w
. technology can provide customizedded experiences tailored to individual consumer preferences. igniting a world of possibilities from the inside out. sponsoring tomorrow starts today. >> the william and and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the presidential campaign's focus turned to foreign policy-- at least for a day-- as mitt romney sought to capitalize on new momentum. in a major speech, he challenged president obama's handling of a host of trouble spots. i know the president hopes for a safer, freer and more prosperous middle east allied with us. i hope this hope but hope is not a strategy. >> woodruff: with that mitt romney took aim at foreign policy today in a speech at virginia military institute in lexington, virginia. >> when we look at the middle east tod
the accolades we have received around the technology, what we would really like to see this work be celebrated for is the power it has in education. and... and that's our dream. we hope that we get an opportunity to run a school like this, that's project-based, that's not satisfied with 50% of the kids dropping out, but see graduation rates of 90-plus percent. the students that have come through this program have gone on to do great things. >> now to a group of high schoolers are setting out to prove that it doesn't take an automotive giant to build a fuel-efficient car. >> it's $10 million. you know, you throw that together with urban high school students, and that put us in the national spotlight. >> anyone can do anything if you put your mind to it. >> are you worried about the competition at all, guys? >> no. >> it was one of those "this is it!" moments the national attention that we got from that was really, i think, humbling because it wasn't like we're gonna win from getting that. like, we gotta work even harder. so, like, now we have to prove ourself to the rest of the country that we'
generation who are much more cosmopolitan and multilingual and savvy about world trends and technologically savvy. mo yan is writing a lot of novels recently. he's published more prolificly in the last three or four years than he has before and i've noticed that he tends to move from a rural focus in the early or midpart of the novel to generationly maybe a more of a focus on the urban environment in the latest stages of the novel. but in so doing he demonstrates a little bit less familiarity with that slice of contemporary chinese life and i think these younger writers are probably more in their -- you might say native habitat when they're writing about these. >> brown: xiao qiang, a brief word on that? how this fits into contemporary writing? >> i think it's very interesting to see how the chinese state media lauded about his receiving this award. in contrast with the former two chinese, as you mentioned, that one is gao xingjian, in exile, the government doesn't approve his politics and the other is liu jiabao. mo yan is his pen name. and his pen name means "don't speak q. sots there's a
more by a long shot. we need to spend more on technology if we want to be competitive in the world. >> why didn't we do this in the smulus program that was enacted? >> i think we should have done more. i think the -- >> was it a commit political compromise that prevented the stimulus program being what might have met your approval. >> it was partly a political compromise. i think it was partly a misdiagnosis. >> even though republicans didn't vote for it. >> that's right. but it was partly a misdiagnosis that we were going to be facing a short-term problem and what i just described are long-term things. and they wanted to focus on things that be would short term fillers. their model was the financial sector was sick. you put it in the hospital. for a year and a half or two, then it recovers. and the economy goes on as it was before. >> even though my impression was that history has told us that it takes longer to recover from a financial recession than a recession that comes from main street. >> that's right. and i think that's only one of the failures that they made in the diagnos
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)

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